Money and Inspiration

Updated: Jan 28

This article mainly for non-profit fundraisers and entrepreneurs was first published in the Shambhala Times in October 2015.




Momentum Money likes momentum, so if you want to ask for more money, organize a work party and then send out a report on what you got done, and what inspiring thing would be possible, with a little more money – a specific amount. “The meditation hall walls are all painted! Now with a $400 carpet– we can buffer the country music from the bar downstairs – by the way, did you know 400 is just 40×10? Can we count on you for $40? or $10?” Show the money gods you are serious by meeting them halfway.


Financial Container Principle Another thing to know is money loves a good container. Whether it’s one time or ongoing, good bookkeeping and regular reporting is a sign of honesty and precision, which makes money feel at home.


On the personal level, if you borrow money from someone it’s your responsibility to keep track of how much is owed and remind him or her periodically that you remember the debt and what the repayment plan is. It’s one thing to owe someone money. It’s quite another to be sloppy about it. It deprives the lender of appreciation for their trust and patience. There is no escaping anything, karmically speaking, so it’s best to strive to repay loans within this lifetime, if you possibly can.


The Power of Planning Money loves good planning. Good planning is like a goose that lays golden eggs. There’s nothing money likes better than an inspiring plan that’s realistic and clearly presented. Keep it simple up front, but include the details in the back. Good graphics show you care, but don’t over do it, which indicates your priorities are off.


Whether it’s for yourself or someone else, a good plan needs to be to be visionary enough to be inspiring and modest enough, or staged in such a way, to be practical. Plans that return the money, or result in more revenue, or significant savings going forward, are best of all. Ideally, everything is worked out such that money is the last piece of the puzzle and the way is clear. A good plan provides clarity, and clarifying complex ideas is the way to earn a lot of money. One caveat is, don’t over-indulge the planning process. Just label it “thinking” and go back to the breath.


Money Manners Money likes good manners. Money often runs in herds. Note, herds can stampede both ways. So it’s best to move slowly, speak gently, and be very patient with money until you gain its trust and then you can relax, and play a little. So rather than chasing money it’s more like you have to create a good space for it and invite it graciously to an elegant and tasteful plan presentation. Tasteful means – with good food. Finally, you guide it in by making it clear what you wish for it to do next.


There’s obviously lots of things to say about money!


Money and Daring The almost-final thing I want to say about money is it is unkind not to ask for it! Don’t be put off by cynicism. If you have a genuine product or cause, respectfully asking people for money is practically the definition of leadership. “Hey folks, look over here. This is important.” You are offering them a means to improve their quality of life, inviting them to share in your inspiration, good karma, and become part of your community, solve a real problem for themselves or others.


It’s very intimate when someone gives you money, or relies on you to help them with money for that matter. You become like family, which is why we are often afraid to ask for money – we are afraid to expose ourselves too. We don’t always want all those new family members. So it’s a good idea to look inward a little before reaching out. Depending on the nature of the situation, it’s also a good idea to actually call them or meet them in person if you can, and also to thank them graciously, all of which show the significance of the situation.

Work on the prior points until you actually feel excited to be offering your members participants, benefactors, boss, or customers this gift of an opportunity. If your inspiration is true, it really is a gift (just don’t call it that).




12 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All